0 thoughts on “Answer me this #3”

  1. Interesting question! I think they can mean the same thing in certain contexts, but to me soul refers specifically to a human being, whereas inanimate things can have spirit, like the spirit of the holidays, school spirit, etc.

    Also, I think when you die you take your soul with you, but your spirit remains behind in your loved-ones’ memories.

  2. I heart you, Lori, you know I do. But these questions!!! Holy guacamole, I need some libations to oil the brain machinery, but the best I can do w/just caffiene on board is that I think someone’s spirit is their Chi, their energy which is present and everlasting both in the mortal sphere and also transcendental space. A person’s soul is their part of the divine and is usually not apparent in everyday life unless you work to develop an attitude of appreciation. (see, Sunday School and the Jesuit University didn’t go to a complete waste for this Buddhist)
    Thanks, ((Hugs))
    How’s Rodge-A-Roni? (Sorry, after such deep thoughts, I had to lighten it up, plus your hubby’s name is quite fun and full of possiblity.)

  3. Wow Lori, you’ve been asking some toughies!

    I think on a deeper level they’re equivalent to me, but I use the words differently on an everyday basis. I’d use soul to mean what we think of as soul, and I’d use spirit for totally unrelated everyday things such as “spirited child,” “spirit of Christmas,” or “we’ve got spirit yes we do, we’ve got spirit how ’bout you?”

  4. It feels like the same thing to me, but then I think that’s the subtle difference–perspective. The soul belongs to and is felt by the individual, but the spirit of that individual is felt by others and lingers and lives in others.

    Hmmmmmm, cool prompt.

  5. Interesting question! I think they can mean the same thing in certain contexts, but to me soul refers specifically to a human being, whereas inanimate things can have spirit, like the spirit of the holidays, school spirit, etc.

    Also, I think when you die you take your soul with you, but your spirit remains behind in your loved-ones’ memories.

  6. I heart you, Lori, you know I do. But these questions!!! Holy guacamole, I need some libations to oil the brain machinery, but the best I can do w/just caffiene on board is that I think someone’s spirit is their Chi, their energy which is present and everlasting both in the mortal sphere and also transcendental space. A person’s soul is their part of the divine and is usually not apparent in everyday life unless you work to develop an attitude of appreciation. (see, Sunday School and the Jesuit University didn’t go to a complete waste for this Buddhist)
    Thanks, ((Hugs))
    How’s Rodge-A-Roni? (Sorry, after such deep thoughts, I had to lighten it up, plus your hubby’s name is quite fun and full of possiblity.)

  7. Wow Lori, you’ve been asking some toughies!

    I think on a deeper level they’re equivalent to me, but I use the words differently on an everyday basis. I’d use soul to mean what we think of as soul, and I’d use spirit for totally unrelated everyday things such as “spirited child,” “spirit of Christmas,” or “we’ve got spirit yes we do, we’ve got spirit how ’bout you?”

  8. It feels like the same thing to me, but then I think that’s the subtle difference–perspective. The soul belongs to and is felt by the individual, but the spirit of that individual is felt by others and lingers and lives in others.

    Hmmmmmm, cool prompt.

  9. This is not an easy question to answer as it’s very abstract. Here’s how I understand it:

    The soul is the totality of our experience. The soul records the impressions of all your life, physical, emotional, and spiritual. The soul can mature over time.

    Your spirit is your True Nature, your essence. It is with you when you are born and when you die. It is not affected by your physical life, per se, like how impressionable our soul is. We often lose touch with our True Nature when we grow up, get a sense of self and an ego, but it is always there. Our spirit is just one expression of the Universal spirit.

    By the way, why do you ask?

  10. Loved everybody’s answers! I believe the soul lives on after death in the afterlife and is who we are without our earthly bodies. A person’s spirit is something that can be felt by others and as Sandy said, lives on with our friends and family in their hearts and minds when we pass on.

  11. This is not an easy question to answer as it’s very abstract. Here’s how I understand it:

    The soul is the totality of our experience. The soul records the impressions of all your life, physical, emotional, and spiritual. The soul can mature over time.

    Your spirit is your True Nature, your essence. It is with you when you are born and when you die. It is not affected by your physical life, per se, like how impressionable our soul is. We often lose touch with our True Nature when we grow up, get a sense of self and an ego, but it is always there. Our spirit is just one expression of the Universal spirit.

    By the way, why do you ask?

  12. Loved everybody’s answers! I believe the soul lives on after death in the afterlife and is who we are without our earthly bodies. A person’s spirit is something that can be felt by others and as Sandy said, lives on with our friends and family in their hearts and minds when we pass on.

  13. This is the way I explained it a long time ago using the three Hebrew words for spirit/soul:

    A person will still look like the person without their nefesh or ruach. Not moving, but still the same. But I think they may one day understand that without a person’s n’shama, they no longer exist. Without my n’shama, I wouldn’t be Melissa. It’s an essence that can’t be recreated, it can’t be contained, it can’t be captured in full, and it can’t be helped by an outside force.

    The longer explanation of the words are here: http://stirrup-queens.blogspot.com/2008/10/conversation-i-never-wanted-to-have.html

  14. I love these answers! I have nothing useful to add, but may have clarified my definitions. Thanks…

  15. This is the way I explained it a long time ago using the three Hebrew words for spirit/soul:

    A person will still look like the person without their nefesh or ruach. Not moving, but still the same. But I think they may one day understand that without a person’s n’shama, they no longer exist. Without my n’shama, I wouldn’t be Melissa. It’s an essence that can’t be recreated, it can’t be contained, it can’t be captured in full, and it can’t be helped by an outside force.

    The longer explanation of the words are here: http://stirrup-queens.blogspot.com/2008/10/conversation-i-never-wanted-to-have.html

  16. I love these answers! I have nothing useful to add, but may have clarified my definitions. Thanks…

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