0 thoughts on “Answer me this #8”

  1. When you grow up in a house with one parent an avowed Republican and one an avowed Democrat, you end up exposed to everything. So, once I went to college, I read and read and read. And, then, I moved out in the real world and saw how delusional some of my beliefs were and my political leanings evolved. I am continually educating myself.

  2. I think it started with my parents, but got nurtured by…interest? Ethical beliefs being turned into political beliefs? Growing up in DC, you’re surrounded by politics so it sort of just seeps into your skin.

  3. When you grow up in a house with one parent an avowed Republican and one an avowed Democrat, you end up exposed to everything. So, once I went to college, I read and read and read. And, then, I moved out in the real world and saw how delusional some of my beliefs were and my political leanings evolved. I am continually educating myself.

  4. My parents were pretty instrumental in the first formation of my beliefs. As it turns out I’ve stuck to those although I diverge from my parents in some areas. I’m not that into politics as I think most of it is b.s. and it pisses me off that we entrust some pretty moronic people to make sure the country is running in the right direction. Not sure what that makes me – I tend to think I vote for the person I believe is the lesser of 2 evils. Yeah, the eternal pessimist am I.

  5. I think it started with my parents, but got nurtured by…interest? Ethical beliefs being turned into political beliefs? Growing up in DC, you’re surrounded by politics so it sort of just seeps into your skin.

  6. My parents were pretty instrumental in the first formation of my beliefs. As it turns out I’ve stuck to those although I diverge from my parents in some areas. I’m not that into politics as I think most of it is b.s. and it pisses me off that we entrust some pretty moronic people to make sure the country is running in the right direction. Not sure what that makes me – I tend to think I vote for the person I believe is the lesser of 2 evils. Yeah, the eternal pessimist am I.

  7. My mom hates politics, my dad on the other hand eats, sleeps and breathes politics. Growing up we did not discuss as a family at all, but my Dad, no one could avoid hearing his views and that holds true even today. He even thinks that some of his brilliant ideas he has submitted to the white house over the years have been used too, LOL. Me, not really into politics that much, I try to keep informed and i am registered as an independant. Oh my Dad, totally, totally 100% die hard to the left!!!!

  8. My parents are political oposites and I’m left of center.. My dad, a middle school teacher,constantly challenges my political beliefs, but I don’t mind. I think he truly feels like it’s his job to make me a republican. We’re a voting family who banters often about politics and I love it. Most of us are open-minded enough to learn from it. ;)

    As a side note, I’m an idealist and corruption in politics REALLY bums me out. I’m trying hard not to become jaded.

  9. I grew up in Chicago, where it is expedient to be a Democrat (thanks for that year of free college tuition!). That helped shape my beliefs, along with the Reaganomics that caused my dad to have to retire at ~age 58 (because his company was sold, and then reorganized, and he was pushed out) when my oldest sister had just started college. That kind of financial reversal hits the whole family, and helps shape your views. Then I got older and didn’t much care about politics. Then I encountered a group of conservatives with whom I disagreed on almost every topic…and I’m more of a centrist.

    So, in summary, it’s been a process, and I expect it to continue as I get older and crankier.

  10. Growing up I was taught not to get involved in politics. It was a religion thing. I never really payed any attention to it at all until I was about 22 or 23. I remember the first time I voted I wasn’t interested in voting for president but there was a measure some were trying to push through in Oregon regarding gay/lesbians and I hated it. Enough that I got involved and voted. Since then it’s been a back and forth. Sometimes intense interest, some times not much interest. For me though the big thing is how it affects people. Is it something that is trying to force one persons or one groups beliefs on to everyone.

  11. My mom hates politics, my dad on the other hand eats, sleeps and breathes politics. Growing up we did not discuss as a family at all, but my Dad, no one could avoid hearing his views and that holds true even today. He even thinks that some of his brilliant ideas he has submitted to the white house over the years have been used too, LOL. Me, not really into politics that much, I try to keep informed and i am registered as an independant. Oh my Dad, totally, totally 100% die hard to the left!!!!

  12. My parents are political oposites and I’m left of center.. My dad, a middle school teacher,constantly challenges my political beliefs, but I don’t mind. I think he truly feels like it’s his job to make me a republican. We’re a voting family who banters often about politics and I love it. Most of us are open-minded enough to learn from it. ;)

    As a side note, I’m an idealist and corruption in politics REALLY bums me out. I’m trying hard not to become jaded.

  13. I grew up in Chicago, where it is expedient to be a Democrat (thanks for that year of free college tuition!). That helped shape my beliefs, along with the Reaganomics that caused my dad to have to retire at ~age 58 (because his company was sold, and then reorganized, and he was pushed out) when my oldest sister had just started college. That kind of financial reversal hits the whole family, and helps shape your views. Then I got older and didn’t much care about politics. Then I encountered a group of conservatives with whom I disagreed on almost every topic…and I’m more of a centrist.

    So, in summary, it’s been a process, and I expect it to continue as I get older and crankier.

  14. Growing up I was taught not to get involved in politics. It was a religion thing. I never really payed any attention to it at all until I was about 22 or 23. I remember the first time I voted I wasn’t interested in voting for president but there was a measure some were trying to push through in Oregon regarding gay/lesbians and I hated it. Enough that I got involved and voted. Since then it’s been a back and forth. Sometimes intense interest, some times not much interest. For me though the big thing is how it affects people. Is it something that is trying to force one persons or one groups beliefs on to everyone.

  15. My politics have changed & evolved over the years. I have always loved election night — I can remember watching the 1968 (Canadian) election returns & asking my mother how to spell “Trudeau.” I won a school-related trip to Ottawa when I was in Grade 12, & returned home so fired up about politics that I changed my plans to major in English & wound up doing a double honours degree in English & political science, with ambitions to work on Parliament Hill. I was a member of the campus Progressive Conservative club, campaigned in elections for local candidates & attended the 1983 national convention. That was a real eye-opener for me — & ultimately a disillusioning experience. (I’ve never seen so many grey-haired old men with girls young enough to be their daughters in my life.) I’ve never been quite so involved or enthralled with politics since then.

    I always self-idetified as “Red Tory” but the right wing has essentially taken over the Conservative Party over the past decade — it’s not the same party I grew up supporting. I am not exactly enthralled with the Liberal Party (& I’m not sure I could ever vote NDP/socialist), but I actually voted Liberal in the last two federal elections, much to my parents’ horror. ; ) I could not in good conscience support the Conservative party in its present format or under its current leadership.

  16. My politics have changed & evolved over the years. I have always loved election night — I can remember watching the 1968 (Canadian) election returns & asking my mother how to spell “Trudeau.” I won a school-related trip to Ottawa when I was in Grade 12, & returned home so fired up about politics that I changed my plans to major in English & wound up doing a double honours degree in English & political science, with ambitions to work on Parliament Hill. I was a member of the campus Progressive Conservative club, campaigned in elections for local candidates & attended the 1983 national convention. That was a real eye-opener for me — & ultimately a disillusioning experience. (I’ve never seen so many grey-haired old men with girls young enough to be their daughters in my life.) I’ve never been quite so involved or enthralled with politics since then.

    I always self-idetified as “Red Tory” but the right wing has essentially taken over the Conservative Party over the past decade — it’s not the same party I grew up supporting. I am not exactly enthralled with the Liberal Party (& I’m not sure I could ever vote NDP/socialist), but I actually voted Liberal in the last two federal elections, much to my parents’ horror. ; ) I could not in good conscience support the Conservative party in its present format or under its current leadership.

  17. Take a hefty dose of experiencing powerlessness and injustice as a child, my mother being shunned by my conservative Catholic neighbors after divorcing her schizophrenic husband, and working for many, many years with the elderly, disabled, and mentally ill. Altogether, it bred a strong distrust of authority and a desire to help the underdog.

    Pretty liberal in many things- but very conservative with others ( I have no problem with the death penalty- I will gladly flip the switch for a pedophile).

  18. Take a hefty dose of experiencing powerlessness and injustice as a child, my mother being shunned by my conservative Catholic neighbors after divorcing her schizophrenic husband, and working for many, many years with the elderly, disabled, and mentally ill. Altogether, it bred a strong distrust of authority and a desire to help the underdog.

    Pretty liberal in many things- but very conservative with others ( I have no problem with the death penalty- I will gladly flip the switch for a pedophile).

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