Apropos of Something

The Fable of the Scorpion and the Frog

A scorpion asks a frog to carry it across a river. The frog hesitates, afraid of being stung, but the scorpion argues that if it did so, they would both drown.election 2016 donald trump hillary clinton

Considering this, the frog agrees, but midway across the river the scorpion does indeed sting the frog, dooming them both.

On the way to their deaths, the frog asks the scorpion: WHY?? The scorpion replies,

“You silly. It’s my nature.”

Fable text via Wikipedia under Creative Commons License Share-Alike 3.0.

~~~~~

Hey, fellow Froggy Voters. Let’s not be surprised when a candidate proves true to their nature. We’ve had plenty of warnings, haven’t we?

~~~~~

As I did for the 2012 election, I’m linking again to VoteMatch. Go ahead and answer the questions, and see if you get any surprises. I did.

And if you still need more, plot yourself on the Nolan Chart (see how well you know yourself).

~~~~~

This post is part of #MicroblogMondays? Whazzat? A post that’s not too long. Head to Stirrup Queens to join the fun.

On the Crime of Being Adopted

News came recently of Adam Crapser, a married father of two who was detained last month and sits in a cell in Tacoma awaiting deportation to Korea , a land he hasn’t seen since he was adopted from there 40 years ago, in 1976. His crime is not his own, and his life in the US can be summarized in four chapters, each its own tragedy:

  • Abused by adoptive family #1, as was his biological sister.
  • Separated from his biological sister when Child Services got involved.
  • Adopted again by a new family, without his sister. Abused and tortured again.
  • Is today facing deportation charges because among all those charged with his care, none ever finalized his naturalization.

Today I offer guest post that reveals injustices around how adoptees are treated in the United States. Adam Pertman, founder of the National Center on Adoption and Permanency, tells of previous cases of adoptee deportation — Adam Crapser’s is not an rarity — along with what you can do to help make things right.
crime of being adopted
Continue reading On the Crime of Being Adopted

Open adoption parenting & mindfulness