Tag Archives: Microblog Mondays

What I’m Watching, Reading, Supporting

Film: Black or White

I watched the Colorado premiere of Kevin Costner’s new film Black or White last night at the  the Colorado Foster Care and Adoption Film Festival.

I loved this film. I loved how these nuanced, flawed people tried to overcome their either/or tendencies to embrace a both/and paradigm for the girl who joined them together. Jillian Estell as Eloise is luminous.

Kudos to the Colorado Department of Human Services and its Office of Children, Youth & Families  for such a successful event. Please please check out waiting children on COHeartGallery.org and consider supporting other luminous kids in any way you can.

Book: You by Caroline Kepnes

simon & schuster book youConsidering I spent almost all my free time this weekend reading You, I’d say I’m obsessed with it. I can’t yet say for certain that I’ll like the middle and the end, but the beginning has me thinking about the story even while I’m going about my day. You is written in the second person and is creepy in the way that Gone Girl was. In fact, if I have any criticism so far, it’s that the book seems to be trying hard to be Gone Girl.

Still, it’s different enough that I keep reading to find out what happens next, how far the characters will go. I think I’ll be wanting to discuss this with, um, You as I turn the pages.

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What are you watching, reading, supporting?

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This post is a part of #Microblog Mondays. What’s that? A post that is between 1 word to 8 sentences long. Head over to Stirrup Queens to join the fun.

Kevin Costner image in social media mentions via Georges Biard [CC BY-SA 3.0], Wikimedia Commons.
Book image via Simon & Schuster.

We Shared a Moment

On one of these long, schooI-less days, I got a rare cuddle from my teen daughter.  She lay with her head in the crook of my arm, the rest of her body sprawled on the couch. We were nose to nose, gazing into each others’ eyes, the way you don’t do often enough because that leads to a soul-to-soul connection, and that means you’re naked and supremely vulnerable.

Vulnerable isn’t an easy place for a teen girl or the mom of a teen girl to live in — or even visit very often.

I looked down at her face — oh, the perfection of her face! Her eyes clear and piercing, lips like they were the model for Cupid’s bow, skin flawless and radiant.

“You’re beautiful, Mama,” she said, mirroring my own thoughts about her.

Apparently she was checking out my skin, too. (My skin on the face that was pointed down toward her, I might add in my defense.) Still with an abundance of love in her voice and eyes, Tessa said,

“Wow. You’re really old.”

turntable record scratch

I was, at first, filled with shame that I’d had the bad sense to grow older. Shame makes me want to lash out, which would for sure ruin this moment of intimacy.

Instead, I took to heart what she said. I am really old, to her very young eyes. And it appears she does not carry the same judgment in saying so that I do in hearing so. I’ve lived on this planet — I’ve thrived on this planet — for a long time.  That’s not nothing; that’s not bad sense. In fact, my goal as her mom is that she do the same.

The love remained in my heart — for both of us.

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This post is a part of #Microblog Mondays. What’s that? A post that is between 1 word to 8 sentences long [oops]. Head over to Stirrup Queens to join the fun.

Image courtesy graur rasvan ionut at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Sound clip courtesy luffie at FreeSound.org [cc 3.0]